Archive for December 2009

What Passes in the Night

It’s not pretty, what is currently going down in Washington, DC. And I’m not talking about the snowstorm or even  Sen. Coburn’s remarks about Sen. Byrd, which has Dana Milibank in a tizzy of disgruntlement. (Why, by the way, is it unseemly for Sen. Coburn to say he hopes – devoutly – that the Dems won’t have enough members to pass the bill tomorrow, while it’s okay for Dems to drag a sick man from his bed to pass something four days before Christmas that not even a majority of Americans WANT? )

Does anyone — ANYONE — really know what is in the bill? And if  you do, HOW could you in good conscience vote for it? As James Taranto noted last week in the Wall Street Journal, even socialist Bernie Sanders was (at least at one time) opposed to it because it is simply not socialist enough.

But here’s this, from Yuval Levin on the Corner:

The CBO assessment of the bill tells the appalling story. We are going to raise taxes by half a trillion dollars over the next ten years, increase spending by more than a trillion dollars, cut Medicare by $470 billion but use that money to fund a new entitlement rather than to fix Medicare itself, bend the health care cost curve up rather than down, insert layers of bureaucracy between doctors and patients, and compel and subsidize universal participation in a failed system of health insurance rather than reform or improve it.

Again, we must wonder WHY Democrats are in such a panic? I mean, don’t they believe they have a mandate from the people? If so, what are they so worried about? Maybe it’s because what the bill will really do and who it will affect is leaking out. See this Sunday evening Wall Street Journal editorial:

Never in our memory has so unpopular a bill been on the verge of passing Congress, never has social and economic legislation of this magnitude been forced through on a purely partisan vote, and never has a party exhibited more sheer political willfulness that is reckless even for Washington or had more warning about the consequences of its actions.

Democrats say that Republicans have no alternatives. That is, of course, hogwash. How about making more minor adjustments to current insurance coverage so that it is portable, available across state lines, gives the same tax benefits to individuals as companies receive, and still ensures coverage for those with preexisting conditions? I HAVE in fact read many ideas from conservatives and Republicans that espouse just this route, and give details on how this could be done, at FAR less cost to taxpayers and patients alike.

Let’s hope the House members want to go home to a HAPPY holiday, and not one where their tax-paying constituents will be openly rioting.

This is the price we must pay so that white liberals could soothe their racial guilt? I feel sick. Guess I should call my doctor before another layer of bureaucracy wants to know WHY.

Hope is not lost — the future knows the truth

The economic truth, that is. As Obama meets with banks to try to loosen lending practices, and as he invites luminaries from private companies, the government, and, err…SEIU and other unions to forums about how to create more jobs (sigh), there is hope in this: students and younger workers are hip to the truth.

See, for example, this post by David Huffman of Chicago Young Republicans, wherein he is shocked to agree with Paul Krugman that the recent “good news” of 11,000 new jobs isn’t that good. But then the agreement with Krugman ends there, as Krugman argues for even more stimulus funds, etc etc.

And then the following note,  by Loyola University Chicago student Elizabeth Davidson about a Wall Street Journal video, reveals an understanding of Keynesian versus supply-side economics, and a thirst for rational thought: Continue reading ‘Hope is not lost — the future knows the truth’ »